Trails

Trails

Public trails open a beautiful, forested natural environment to the public on a year-round basis.

Who can use the TRAILS?

  • Any member of the public can use the trails.
  • Trails vary in difficulty. Some are suitable for families with young children. Others offer greater challenges.
  • Trails can be used year round for walking, hiking and snow-shoeing.

Environmentally sensitive trails fulfill the four tenets of conservation:

  • Preservation: they protect the land by ensuring that people are able to use it without damaging
    environmentally-sensitive areas.
  • Education: they are “living labs” for the education of our youth.
  • Research: they provide access to biologically diverse areas.
  • Recreation: they provide a venue for healthy recreation.

Scowen Park Trail

The Massawippi Trail at Scowen Park was officially opened on Thanksgiving weekend, 2016.  This trail is located on the Capelton Road, North Hatley.   This property, protected by the Massawippi Conservation Trust, provides hikers with almost 4 kilometres of trails, suitable for families looking for a pleasant meandering hike in a lovely forest that is within walking distance for North Hatley residents or visitors staying in North Hatley.  A parking area is also available at the entrance.

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Ste Catherine de Hatley Trail

The Massawippi Trail in Ste. Catherine de Hatley is located at the end of the cul de sac on chemin Piemont, off chemin Gingras, Ste. Catherine de Hatley. The trail begins with a 3 kilometre loop named George’s Loop in honour of the donor of the land. There is also a shorter 1.5 kilometre loop. Both are suitable for families. There is a parking area at the entrance.

The first section of the trail was officially opened in August, 2017. In 2018, another 3 and a half kilometres were added, heading south from George’s Loop. This section will be ready for hiking in the summer of 2019. The extension of the trail will provide access to lake Massawippi and to a beach owned and protected by the Massawippi Conservation Trust, via a long wooden staircase.

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